Tag Archives: organ donation

Survey says–Donating a kidney to save a life is a huge return for the donor!

I recently ran a survey for kidney donors through a large private support site and we had an excellent response! One of our responders said, “Donating a kidney was a defining moment in my life. It showed me the capacity to love and care for someone else. Realizing you’re making a decision that is beyond yourself is a very humbling experience and I wouldn’t have changed any part of the journey for anything”. Cody, Santa Rosa, CA,  22 at the time of surgery in 2007

The news was pretty much what I expected or in fact reflected my own experience.  Interestingly a majority of respondents said that they would donate again!  Frankly this wasn’t even one of my questions, these responses were left in the open comments box.

We asked donors what amount of time did it take to become approved as an organ donor? Our responders who are from various parts of the United States answer’s varied. From up to a year, to as little as 2 months. Our average response was 5 months before they received approval to donate their kidney.

As you can see by the chart below most of our donors 78.79% are direct donations and gave to a family member, a friend, or a co-worker. The good Samaritan donation is someone who chooses to donate to someone they had never met before!

I was surprised to see only a few people were paired exchange donations. Kidney paired donation is an option for living donor pairs who are not compatible with each other. For example, I was not a match for my brother Tim, however through a paired exchange program I was able to become part of a swap with eight other donor/recipients. Therefore my kidney went to NYC and my brother’s kidney came from Philadelphia. etc. Within 24 hours of being added to the National Kidney Registry (NKR) they found a match for my brother.
surveyStudies show that a donor will take a risk to help another in a moments notice; they often think only about giving life to another, particularly when a loved one is involved.

I asked an open-ended question on the survey “Did donating your organ have any affect on how you view life today”?  Some of the responses were…

“It made me again realize how important each of us are on this earth, for whatever reason, little or big, we are here to serve and love one another and help one another on this journey”. Julie, 47 at the time of donation, Imperial Beach

“When I first learned about altruistic donation, I thought it was incredibly cool that there were people in the world who would do that. Now I get to be one”. Carol, 59 at the time of donation.

“I’d do it again. I firmly believe living donors and pairings are the only way to reduce the kidney waiting list”.  Kara, 54 at the time of donation, Chicago

“It made me realize how good it feels to give. I became more active in volunteer work following my donation”.  Michelle, 25 at the time of donation, Rochester, NY

“Yes – don’t waste time striving for happiness, positive outlooks, and making others feel happy”. David, 27 at the time of donation, Boston

“I’ve always lived life the same….but this was probably the most amazing thing I have done. I’d do it again….in a heart beat”. Tara, 34  at time of donation, Bakersfield, CA

When you consider what the surgery entails along with some risks for the donor, these responses and so many others received are remarkable, but not surprising.

Most patients undergo laparoscopic surgery for kidney donation and require a hospital stay of only two to three days. For me, I was 52 when I donated and am now back to doing the same active things I did before my surgery! Including plans for a 100 mile bike ride in the Spring.

Another interesting comment that seems to be common thread is; donor’s do not like to be perceived as heroes. They simply took a step to help another and of course wouldn’t you do the same? Would you?  We would love to hear from you? What are your thoughts on organ donation? Take our survey!

About: The first Kidney donation was done in 1954. There are some risks for the donor and you must be healthy. Most patients undergo laparoscopic surgery for kidney donation and require a hospital stay of only two to three days. For me, I was 52 when I donated and am now back to doing the same active things I did before my surgery! Over 50,000 living donors who have donated their kidneys to people facing kidney failure.

 

 

Sitting quietly may not result in organ donation – living kidney donor

Sarah Murnaghan,  a 10 year old girl who suffers from severe cystic fibrosis and whose efforts to qualify for an organ donation spurred public debate over how organs are allocated, underwent a successful double-lung transplant on Wednesday. Source: Comcast News.  Read more on Sarah receiving a lung transplant!
 
Many people nationwide understand the importance of raising awareness about organ donation.  If Sarah’s family had sat quietly by her bedside without fighting her story would be very different and likely one that none of us would have ever heard.Sarah-Murnaghan
 
I often see requests from men, women, and children in need of an organ and using social media as a way to get the word out  in asking for a donation. Social media can be an excellent way and their are many success stories utilizing facebook to find a donor. I recently read that one in 10 American adults, more than 20 million, have some level of CKD (chronic kidney disease).  Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
 
Why do some recipients appear to have a large group of family and friends ready to participate while others quietly die waiting for an organ. Why are some families and friends inclined to do whatever it takes and others are not? I know in my family when my brother Tim needed a kidney, he shared very little information.  He didn’t tell us he needed one because he was uncomfortable asking us — probably because he was the oldest of six and was never in the position to ask for help. 
 
I took it upon myself to find out more information and then got tested.  I was disappointed to find I was not a match and thought that was the end of it – until a good friend of mine Dr. Brian Justice mentioned that I could donate my kidney as part of an exchange program.  In a paired donor exchange, or a kidney swap, two kidney recipients essentially “swap” to willing donors. I had no idea this was a possible option! The hospital didn’t mention it to me nor did my brother Tim.
 
For my family, like Sarah’s, this story has a happy ending.  I was able to donate a kidney through the National Kidney Registry (NKR) and my brother in turn received one and is doing great. All of this happened within 24 hours of being approved on the NKR!
 
What is the answer for those waiting for a life saving organ donation? For Sarah it was getting the attention of the media, changing a law and getting on a list.
 
But what about those who need an organ– a living organ is often the best solution.  I urge you….
  • Find an advocate-  it can often be easier for someone else to tell your story than yourself 
  • Shout it from the rooftops – reach out to the press, social media and tell your family & friends
  • Tell a compelling story – tell your personal story.
  • Arm yourself with as much information as possible about the organ donation process and your options.
  • Attend a workshop for example:  http://www.facebook.com/#!/LivingKidneyDonorsNetwork

 Wendy